Himalayan Journal vol.34
The Himalayan Journal
Vol.34

Publication year:
1976

Editor:
Soli S. Mehta
Index
  1. EVEREST SOUTH-WEST FACE CLIMBED
    (Doug Scott)
  2. THE FRENCH EXPEDITION TO PUMORI (7,145 m.), 1975
    (Gerard Sighele)
  3. TREKKING IN NEPAL HIMALAYA - LANGTANG VALLEY
    (Rajendra Desai)
  4. DHAULAGIRI II -EAST RIDGE, 1975
    (Yoshio Kameyama)
  5. FIRST ASCENT AND TRAGEDY ON DHAULAGIRI IV, 1975
    (SHIRO NISHAMAE)
  6. TALUNG, 1975
    (A. J. S. GREWAL)
  7. ACCOUNT OF THE EXPLORATION OF TONGSHIONG GLACIER AND THE ZEMU GAP (19,230 ft.)
    (By J. K. BAJAJ)
  8. ACCOUNT OF AN ATTEMPT ON GUICHA PEAK (20,100 ft.)
    (P. C. S. RAUTELA)
  9. PHOKSUMDO LAKE
    (SUMANT SHAH)
  10. NORTH NANDADEVI BASIN AFTER FORTY YEAR
    (KIYOSHI SHIMIZU)
  11. THE ASCENT OF NANDADEVI AND NANDADEVI EAST, 1975
    (BALWANT S. SANDHU)
  12. KALANKA, 1974
    (MIKE TOWNEND)
  13. ASCENTS OF BANDARPUNCH (6,316 M.), 1975
    (L. P. SHARMA)
  14. THE I.M.A. EXPEDITION TO GANG CHUA AND LEO PARGIAL, 1974
    (JAGJIT SINGH)
  15. ACROSS KUGTI AND CHOBIA PASSES
    (K. C. PRASHAR)
  16. ON SKIS ACROSS ROHTHANG
    (RUPENDRA KUMAR SHARMA)
  17. KISHTWAR 1975
    (ROB COLLISTER)
  18. POLISH ASCENTS OF GASHERBRUM II AND III, 1975
    (JANUSZ ONYSZKIEWICZ)
  19. MY ESCAPE FROM GASHERBRUM II
    (LOUIS AUDOUBERT)
  20. VICTORY AND TRAGEDY ON BROAD PEAK, 1975
    (J. FERENSKI and K. GLAZEK)
  21. MOUNTAINS OF THE THUI GOL
    (DAVE BROADHEAD)
  22. SHAKLHAUR, 1975
    (DR. MARIAN BALA)
  23. AVALANCHE SEARCH TODAY
    (WALTER F. LORCH)
  24. EXPERIENCE WITH RESCUE TRANSCEIVERS
    (PETER S. LAWTON)
  25. THE GAURISHANKAR QUESTION
    (OVE SKJERVEN)
  26. BIRDS OF SWAT AND GILGIT
    (R. J. ISHERWOOD)
  27. HEAD INJURIES
    (BRAD FRANCIS)
  28. THE COLDER YOU ARE, THE WARMER YOU'LL BE
    (ELLIS LADER)
  29. THE SECOND SWEDISH EXPEDITION TO THE HIMALAYA, 1975
    (DR. S. UNGERHOLM)
  30. EXPEDITIONS TXIMIST TO EVEREST 1974
    (J. X. LORENTE ZUGUZA)
  31. LHOTSE, 1975
    (RICCARDO CASSIN)
  32. ANNAPURNA SOUTH PEAK-SOUTH-WEST RIDGE, 1974
    (TSUNEO SUZUKI)
  33. CHUREN HIMAL, 1974
    (HIROAKI YAMADA)
  34. TRISUL, 1975
    (MICHAEL CLARKE)
  35. DUNAGIRI, 1975
    (JOE TASKER)
  36. THE SILVER GOD MOUNTAIN (MULKILA) 1975
    (WARWICK DEACOCK)
  37. THE SPANISH EXPEDITION TO MANALI, 1975
    (JAIME MATAS)
  38. BRITISH EXPEDITION TO THE NOSHAQ REGION, 1974
    (ERIC ROBERTS)
  39. THE SPANISH HIMALAYAN EXPEDITION TO SARAGHRAR, 1975
    (RAMON BRAMONA RAMS)
  40. PURWAKSHAN VALLEY HINDU KUSI1. 1975
    (M. POPKO)
  41. THE 1975 NORTH OF ENGLAND HIMALAYA EXPEDITION
    (PAUL BEAN)
  42. OBITUARY
  43. BOOK REVIEWS
  44. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
  45. CLUB PROCEEDINGS 1975

DUNAGIRI, 1975

JOE TASKER

Britisi Two-man Garwhal Expedition
This was the first visit of myself and Dick Renshaw to the invn We had had extensive experience in the European Alps in climbing snow, ice and iced-up rock and where the problems one faces as regards weather and conditions in general are, similar to the Himalayas, but where one doesn't have the same problems of altitude to contend with.

We chose Dhgunagiri because we wanted to climb in the Garwhal area and our first choice, Changabang was already booked by Ho from Manchester we organized, over several months, our small scale expedition and arrived in Delhi on 21 September were we were given invaluable assistance in clearing up final formalities by friends in the offices of G.K.W.

Many people expressed doubts that the two of us would be able to climb 23,000 foot Dunagiri and we were urged to enlarge the team. But by the time, we reached Base Camp at 15,000 feet there were just the two of us-a friend who had come along for the trek had gone back and the Liaison Officer was obliged to return also. Thus we found ourselves in the idyllic situation of being just two against the mountain. The difficulties of course would be so much greater but as we found out, the satisfaction was so much greater too. We were not using high-altitude porters either.

Dunagiri had been climbed in 1939 by Andre Roche and his team from Switzerland, but we wanted to climb it by a more difficult route using bivouacs rather than fixed camps.

We chose the South Rib which descends directly from the summit and (starting on 3 October) over six days we worked our way up the shattered rock in the lower part, then iced-up ground in the middle and a final steep band of rock several hundred feet high to the summit snow slopes and the summit, at midday on 8 October.

The descent took five long days, the ground being almost as difficult to descend as it had been to ascend. We ran short of food and fuel for our stove and reached Base Camp in a very tired and hungry state.

During the descent the weather was not always good, and whilst having to carry out manoeuvres on some very steep and difficult ice Dick Renshaw got frostbitten fingers through the necessity of taking off his gHoves in the driving wind and snow in order to place and remove ice pitons.

In spite of the difficult and demanding nature of the climb which exhausted us both, we felt a tremendous satisfaction at having climbed Dunagiri by a technically difficult route more similar to the climbs in Europe than in the Himalaya, and having done it as a two-man team, without fixed ropes, fixed camps or any assistance other than ourselves on the mountain.