Himalayan Journal vol.31
The Himalayan Journal
Vol.31

Publication year:
1971

Editor:
Soli S. Mehta
Index
  1. EDITORIAL
  2. A. R. HINKS AND THE FIRST EVEREST EXPEDITION, 1921
    (T. S. BLAKENEY)
  3. EVEREST REVISITED THE INTERNATIONAL HIMALAYAN EXPEDITION, 1971
    (NORMAN G. DYHRENFURTH)
  4. POST-MORTEM OF AN INTERNATIONAL EXPEDITION
    (KEN WILSON AND MIKE PEARSON)
  5. 'QUESTIONABLE CONCLUSIONS IN EVEREST FILM'
    (KEN WILSON)
  6. ACCLIMATIZATION
    (Dr. PETER STEELE)
  7. THE HIMALAYAN ETHIC-TIME FOR A RETHINK ?
    (DENNIS GRAY)
  8. THE JAPANESE MOUNT EVEREST EXPEDITION, 1969-1970
    (HIROMI OHTSUKA)
  9. CAVING IN THE HIMALAYA
    (A. C. WALTHAM)
  10. THE BRITISH KARST RESEARCH EXPEDITION, 1970
    (JANET M. WALTHAM)
  11. ‘WHERE NO PLANES FLY'
    (JOHN ALLEN)
  12. MANASLU WEST WALL, 1971
    (AKIRA TAKAHASHI)
  13. GANGAPURNA NORTH-WEST RIDGE, 1971
    (KATUHIKO MIYOSHI)
  14. THE JAPANESE MT. API EXPEDITION, 1971
    (KATSUYUKI FUKUZAWA)
  15. DHAULAGIRI IV, 1969
    (LEO GRAF)
  16. ‘AND AFTERWARDS...'
    (KLAUS KUBIENA)
  17. CHUREN HIMAL, 1969
    (PAOLO CONSIGLIO)
  18. THE FIRST ASCENT OF THE MAIN PEAK OF CHUREN HIMAL, 1970
    (RYOZO YAMAMOTO)
  19. CHUREN HIMAL, 1971
    (MAKOTO TAKAHASI, KATSUHIKO KANO and KOSEI IDETA)
  20. ANNAPURNA SOUTH PEAK (7,195 M.) SOUTH FACE, 1970
    (MAURICE GICQUEL)
  21. PT 21,133 FT.-THE EASTERN OUTLIER OF ANNAPURNA SOUTH,1 1971
    (CRAIG ANDERSON)
  22. DHAULAGIRI II, 1971
    (FRANZ HUBER)
  23. THE CZECHOSLOVAC EXPEDITION TO ANNAPURNA IV (7,525 m.), 1969
    (VLADIMIR PROCHAZKA)
  24. THE INDIAN JOGIN EXPEDITION, 1970
    (AMULYA SEN)
  25. PUNJAB, 1970
    (CORRADINO RABBI)
  26. SOUTH MALANA GLACIER AND THE MANIKARAN SPIRES, 1971
    (GRAHAM CLARK)
  27. THE ASCENT OF KULU PUMORI, 1970
    (ASHWANI SAITH)
  28. PAPSURA, 1971
    (FLT. LT. V. P. SINGH)
  29. THE KISHTWAR HIMALAYA EXPEDITION, 1971
    (CHARLES CLARKE)
  30. MALUBITING - THE MUNICH KARAKORAM EXPEDITION, 1970
    (PETER VON GIZYCKI)
  31. THE ASCENT OF K6, 1970
    (EDUARD KOBLMULLER)
  32. FIRST ASCENT OF CHONGRA PEAK (22,390 FT = 6,830 M.)
    (MASAHIKO KAITSU)
  33. THE SECOND CZECHOSLOVAC TATRA EXPEDITION TO THE HIMALAYA -NANGA PARBAT (8,125 M.), 1971
    (MICHAL OROLIN)
  34. ODYSSEY ON NANGA PARBAT
    (REINHOLD MESSNER)
  35. KHINYANG CHHISH CLIMBED
    (ANDRZEJ KUS)
  36. ISTOR-O-NAL
    (DR. IVO VALIC)
  37. SHAH FULADI (5,135 M.), 1971
    (MASAHIKO KAITSU)
  38. EXPLORATION AND ASCENTS IN THE BUNI ZOM GROUP, 1971
    (ROBERT WAGNER and ALBERT WACHTEN)
  39. ALPINE EXPLORATION OF THE WAKHAN 1
    (HENRI AGRESTI)
  40. THE EXPLORATION OF THE HINDU RAJ
    (Dr. A. DIEMBERGER)
  41. SARAGHRAR AND LANGAR GROUP
    (TSUNEO MIYAMORI (JAC))
  42. HIMALAYAN NOMENCLATURE
  43. BOOK REVIEWS
  44. OBITUARY
  45. LETTER TO THE EDITOR
  46. EXPEDITION NOTES
  47. CLUB PROCEEDINGS, 1971

SHAH FULADI (5,135 M.), 1971

MASAHIKO KAITSU

The two of us, Kiyoshi Hara and myself, were the members of the Japanese Chongra Peak Expedition to Pakistan in the summer of 1971. And on our way to Europe after this expedition, we stayed in Kabul to buy official maps of Afghanistan from the Afghan Cartographic Institute. After some formalities with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, I got four sheets of 1:250,000 map. One of these sheets covered the Koh-e-Baba range which is the western end of the Hindu Kush range and very close to Bamyan. The height of it is not so high. Even so, the highest peak of the range named Shah Fuladi is 5,135 m„ but this rarely visited range contains many mountain groups completely unknown and unclimbed, and many pretty glaciers and rock walls some of which are more than 600 metres in height. The accessibility is very easy. In our case it took only three and a half days, by bus and then on foot from Kabul to the foot of Shah Fuladi. Above all, we were completely exempted from any troublesome duty of getting permission from any authorities.

So this Koh-e-Baba range is without doubt full of charm for mountaineers and unorthodox expeditions, like ours, or for the travellers who want to appreciate the mood of an expedition mixed with sightseeing.

For about ten hours we were packed in a small dirty bus from Kabul to Bamyan. The road was, of course, unpaved and crossing through a high pass and desert area; the bus groaned in agony

After a night in Bamyan at a local inn, we left for the Koh-e Baba range with equipments of a 110 metre rope, a small bivouacking tent, two pairs of crampons, two ice axes, three ice pitons, one stove and food for five days.

The road along Dara-i-Syalayak was of dirt but broad enough to be jeepable. The scenery was interesting. We saw many caves in mud cliffs which must be the same kind as that at Bamyan. At each village people came out and asked us where we were going. We could see green strips of vegetation only along the river, the rest was only brown soil and sand desert

At a bridge at Sina we left Dara-i-Syalayak and followed a small stream. The sunlight at midday was so strong that we were dried up in the throat and body. We stopped our march at three o'clock in the village of Katasan. There seemed to have been very few expeditions in this region, because soon after we arrived most of the villagers, including women, came out and watched us intently.

Next day we followed the same stream for about two hours, and then a broad grazing field stretched out before our eyes.' Only four mud houses could be seen. Maybe most of the herds of sheep and goat had gone down to the lower villages by this time, only a few cows and sheep were grazing around. From the western end of this field we crossed a small hill and went down to a small frozen stream. It seemed to lead us to the foot of the mountain. But soon it was getting dark. Again we had to pass a night far below our target. In spite of the horrible heat during the day, the temperature went down below freezing point in the night. This must be one of the particular features of the inner part of Asia.

On 31 October we trod the valley bed which was dried up then. A three-hour walk, passing a small lake, brought us to the foot of Shah Fuladi. Unfortunately, flakes of snow began to drift at that time, and we were already on the glacier covered by scree, so we had to look for a possible camping sight and pitched our small tent. Soon the scenery around changed into white. We could not believe such a sudden change of weather in a land of such monotonous geographical structure. This must be the first heavy snow this season!



Approach route to Shah Fuladi

Approach route to Shah Fuladi



The Northern face of Shah Fuladi, 5,135 m.

The Northern face of Shah Fuladi, 5,135 m.