Himalayan Journal vol.07
The Himalayan Journal
Vol.07

Publication year:
1935

Editor:
Kenneth Mason
Index
  1. NANDA DEVI AND THE SOURCES OF THE GANGES
    (H.W. Tilman)
  2. THE GERMAN HIMALAYAN EXPEDITION TO NANGA PARBAT, 1934
    (FRITZ BECHTOLD)
  3. DIARY JOTTINGS NANGA PARBAT, 1934
    (CAPTAIN R. A. K. SANGSTER)
  4. THE SCIENTIFIC WORK OF THE GERMAN HIMALAYAN EXPEDITION TO NANGA PARBAT, 1934
    (I. GENERAL r. finsterwalder)
  5. A VISIT TO NUN KUN, 1934
    (LIEUT. J. B. HARRISON)
  6. THE PROBLEM OF KANGCHENJUNGA
    (F. S. SMYTHE)
  7. TRAVERSES IN NEPAL
    (J. B. AUDEN)
  8. NOTES ON EASTERN AND CENTRAL NEPAL
    (LIEUT.-COLONEL KENNETH MASON)
  9. SIWALIK EROSION
    (A.P.F. Hamilton)
  10. THE FORESTS OF TIBET
    (Captain F. KINGDON WARD)
  11. SIKKIM RHODODENDRONS
    (P. C. DUNCAN)
  12. ON THE MAP OF THE ZEMU GLACIER
    (RICHARD FINSTERWALDER)
  13. THE GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY OF THE HIMALAYA
    (Lieut.- Colonel Kenneth Mason)
  14. EXPEDITIONS
  15. IN MEMORIAM
  16. NOTES
  17. REVIEWS
  18. CORRESPONDENCE
  19. CLUB PROCEEDINGS
  20. CLUB NOTICES
  21. LIBRARY NOTICES

CORRESPONDENCE

Mountaineering in the Kashmir Himalaya

The Editor,

The Himalayan Journal.

Dear Colonel,

If you will forgive me, I should like to draw attention to an error in your footnote to my brief paper in the last Himalayan Journal. You stated that I reached within 300 feet of the summit of Teak 15,928' from the Basmai side.[1] Actually this climb was carried out up the second glacier in the Thajiwas valley, the one stated by Colonel Watts to be the most difficult in the valley This is the glacier to the south of Teak 15,928'.

The glacier to the south of Teak 15,928' was decidedly difficult in August, but even then it was possible to get above the difficulties in only five hours climbing from the foot of the glacier. I should imagine that there would be sufficient snow on the glacier in June to make it easy. This is undoubtedly the best way to climb the peak.

I never saw the peak well from the Basmai side, as it was hidden in clouds during the whole crossing of the pass. I should however imagine that it would merely be a laborious rock scramble from this side. The rock appeared rather rotten, and the slopes did not appear to be so steep as on the Thajiwas side.

I am afraid that I do not agree with Colonel Watts that it is un- climbable from the glacier to the north, on the Thajiwas side. A long snow and ice couloir leads up between the two highest summits of the peak. Although very steep it is, I think, climbable and stones do not begin to fall till after midday. I actually got half-way up this couloir last year, on my first guideless climb. If this was possible to me as a beginner, I am convinced that a resolute party of fairly expert climbers could do it.

Yours sincerely,

R.A. Mess, James Waller.

Allahabad, U.P.

27th November 1934.


[1] Himalayan Journal, vol. vi, p. 132. I apologize for the error. In his note Lieutenant Waller did not mention that he had climbed in the Thajiwas nullah and only mentioned that he crossed the Basmai Gali. I wrongly assumed he must have attempted the peak from that side, which is undoubtedly much easier. Colonel Watts's remarks on the two glaciers descending from the peak on the Thajiwas side are in the same Journal, vol. vi, p. 128.-Ed.